Voice Search

Future of Voice Search

Is voice search for the future of mobile search? The jury is still out, but Google says that 20 percent of all searches on mobile are now voice searches – and that number is growing.

While you currently can’t target voice searches directly, if you are interested in driving conversions from voice searches, here are some tips to consider for moving forward.

Understand what makes voice search different

Voice search queries tend to be longer. In 2004, most searches were 2 or 3 words. Today, search queries can be 27+ words. Voice searches also tend to be more specific (for example, searching for “find the closest open store that sells a Ford F-150 ” instead of just “Ford F-150”).

Analyze your longer tail keywords to find patterns

Since voice searches are usually more natural and conversational, keyword optimization should fit this new long-tail landscape.

Use modified broad match keywords

Modified broad match lets you specify that specific broad match keywords or close variants (such as +make +model +locatoin) must appear to show your search ad. So even if the voice search is 30 words, as long as 3 of those are “make,” “model,” and “location” your ad will appear.

Negative out keywords that aren’t driving customers

As you test and refine your keyword list for voice search, be sure to negative any words from a modified broad match that indicate the searcher is not a potential customer.

Be sure to give voice searches the option of calling

People use voice search because it is easy and hands-free. It makes sense that a voice searcher would want to keep using voice to engage with a business – and that means a phone call.

Speak in the language of “mobile.”

Since these ads will only be seen by people on their smartphones, your ad language should reflect it.

Tell searchers that operators are standing by to take their call. Use mobile-specific calls to action such as “Shop our mobile site,” “Buy on your phone,” “Find nearby stores,” and “Call us now.”